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Gallery Location:

Gastown
312 Water Street
Vancouver BC
Canada V6B 1B6

P: 604.684.9222
E: art@coastalpeoples.com
 
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NEW ADDRESS AS OF APRIL 1ST, 2017
332 Water Street, Unit 200
Vancouver, BC V6B 1B6

Open Daily 10:00am - 6:00pm
Extended Hours 10:00am - 7:00pm (April 15 - October 15)
After hours: Open by appointment only

Closed: Christmas Day; Boxing Day; New Year's Day

Near Skytrain station - Waterfront

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David Gonzales

Coast Salish (Squamish Nation)
 
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David Gonzales

Coast Salish (Squamish Nation)
 

David was born on April 10, 1971. He grew up in Brentwood Bay, on the Ts'artlip Rerserve on Vancouver Island. He is a member of the Squamish Nation of the Coast Salish Peoples.

When David was in the fourth grade, Charles Elliot and John Elliot were invited as guest speakers to talk to the class about native art. This experience sparked David's interest in the art. David began carving red and yellow cedar wood at the age of 12, when he produced his first talking stick. For the most part, David is self-taught, siting library books as his most influential source for information and inspiration.

In 1998, David moved to the Nass Valley. He married a Nisga'a woman was adopted into the nation by chief Horace Stevens of the Raven Tribe. Here, David had the opportunity to carve with Nisga'a artists such as Chester Moore and Ritchie Morgan. David assisted these carvers with two 40 ft totems, which were raised in the nearby communities of New Aiyansh and Kincolith.

In 2000, David began learning Tsimshian art by studying under master carver Herber Reece. It was under Herber's tutelage that David began creating masks.

David's repertoire of First Nations art expanded, when he graduated from the Northwest Jewelry Arts School in 2010. The program was instructed by renowned jewelry designer Dan Wallace of the Kwakuitl nation. It was here that he learned to carve jewelry in silver and in gold. David was also given the privilege to carve with Rick Atkins of the Haida nation.

Progressively throughout his career, David's work has become more refined and typical of traditional Northwest Coast style. He has incorporated his First Nations designs into wooden sculptures, paintings, jewelry and clothing.


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