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Gallery Location:

Gastown
312 Water Street
Vancouver BC
Canada V6B 1B6

P: 604.684.9222
E: art@coastalpeoples.com
 
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NEW ADDRESS AS OF APRIL 1ST, 2017
332 Water Street, Unit 200
Vancouver, BC V6B 1B6

Open Daily 10:00am - 6:00pm
Extended Hours 10:00am - 7:00pm (April 15 - October 15)
After hours: Open by appointment only

Closed: Christmas Day; Boxing Day; New Year's Day

Near Skytrain station - Waterfront

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Napachie Ashoona

Cape Dorset
 
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Napachie Ashoona

Cape Dorset
 

Napachie Ashoona was born on October 10, 1974, in Cape Dorset, Baffin Island. He is a member of one of the most prominent families of Inuit artists in Canada. His Grandmother, Pitseolak Ashoona, was a famous printmaker, and so is his talented mother, Sorosiluto. His father, Kiawak and uncle Kaka ( now deceased ) are two well-known Inuit artists. Other artists in the family include Koomwartok ( now deceased ) and Namonai, and their sister Napatchie, all three sculptors. Kaka's son, Ohito Ashoona, has become famous for his carvings of Polar Bears, and his son Ottokie has followed the same artistic path.

When Napachie was a small child, he used to watch his father carving and occasionally would help him sand or file. With a lot of patience and help from his father, he soon learned how to handle the stone. Undoubtedly, Kiawak had a very strong influence on Napachie, both in style and thematically. 

Like his father, Napachie enjoys carving the human body in action. With their expressive and very detailed faces, and bodies in full motion, Napachie's hunters and drum dancers are very reminiscent of Kiawak's work, and approach the Master's technical control in representing the volume. Napachie has yet to explore the rich world of Inuit mythological imagery, so present in his father's work. 

Napachie carves in the local stone called serpentine. It is very hard metamorphic rock indigineous to Baffin Island, with a structure similar to jade. The colour of the stone varies from light green to brown or even black and like his father, Napachie prefers the darker shades.

 


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