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Gallery Location:

Gastown
312 Water Street
Vancouver BC
Canada V6B 1B6

P: 604.684.9222
E: art@coastalpeoples.com
 
Hours
NEW ADDRESS AS OF APRIL 1ST, 2017
332 Water Street, Unit 200
Vancouver, BC V6B 1B6

Open Daily 10:00am - 6:00pm
Extended Hours 10:00am - 7:00pm (April 15 - October 15)
After hours: Open by appointment only

Closed: Christmas Day; Boxing Day; New Year's Day

Near Skytrain station - Waterfront

Gallery policy:
Exchanges or store credit only
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Mary Pudlat

Cape Dorset
 
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Mary Pudlat

Cape Dorset
 

Mary was born on May 3, 1923 in Arctic Quebec and resided in Cape Dorset until her death in February 2001.

"A prolific Canadian Inuit artist, Mary Pudlat retains clear memories of her early years living in the traditional Inuit hunting lifestyle in the area near Povungnituk in Arctic Quebec.  Orphaned as a teenager, she lived for a while with her brother in Ivujivik before moving to Baffin Island in the early 1940s.  There she married Samuelie Pudlat in 1943 and continued to live in the traditional semi-nomadic camps along the south shore of Baffin Island until she and her husband and children moved permanently to Cape Dorset in 1963.

"At the time of Pudlat's arrival in Cape Dorset, the new West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative fine arts program was gaining momentum and she began to explore her own talent for drawing and sculpting in soapstone.  Pudlat's artwork, tentative at first, became increasingly confident.  Like many other Inuit aritsts, she turned to her experience on the land for inspiration, carving  and drawing birds, fish, human figures and activities from the traditional culture.  The selection of one of Pudlat's images of a bear for inclusion into the 1964-1965 Cape Dorset Print Collection gave her initial encouragement but the demands of her young family and custodial work that she occasionally performed for the Co-operative, left her limited time for her art in the following years.  After her husband's death in 1979, however, and with her children becoming more independent, Pudlat returned to drawing during the 1980s".

Marion E. Jackson in North American Women Artists of the Twentieth Century: A Biographical Dictionary. 1995 


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