Coastal Peoples Fine Art Gallery
New Arrivals
Home
Exhibitions
About Us
Contact Us
Art Match
How to Purchase
Under $1500
$1501 - $5000
$5001 + upwards
Gift Certificates
Argillite
Basketry
Books
Glasswork
Graphics
Jewelry
Masks
Pottery
Sculpture
Textiles
Totem Poles
Inuit
Maori Jewelry & Sculpture
Maps
Artist Biographies
Crest Figures
Corporate Services
Paddle Shapes
Worldwide Shipping
Careers + Opportunities
Language Translation
Gallery Location:

Gastown
312 Water Street
Vancouver BC
Canada V6B 1B6

P: 604.684.9222
E: art@coastalpeoples.com
 
Hours
NEW ADDRESS AS OF APRIL 1ST, 2017
332 Water Street, Unit 200
Vancouver, BC V6B 1B6

Open Daily 10:00am - 6:00pm
Extended Hours 10:00am - 7:00pm (April 15 - October 15)
After hours: Open by appointment only

Closed: Christmas Day; Boxing Day; New Year's Day

Near Skytrain station - Waterfront

Gallery policy:
Exchanges or store credit only
RapidSSL Site Seal
Sign In  |  New Account  |  Subscribe  |  Contact Us  |  1-888-686-9298  |  View Shopping Cart  |  Checkout
  Advanced Search

Stan Greene

Coast Salish Nation
 
View artist biography

Stan Greene

Coast Salish Nation
 
“People’s eyes are opening up now and they’re interested in Salish art,” points out Stan Greene, who is a major force in Salish art today. He works in watercolours, cedar wood and silk-screen prints.

In 1978, at the age of twenty-five, Stan produced his first Salish prints, inspired by carved Spindle Whorls, used by the Salish as a tool to spin Mountain Goat wool. At this point in time he actively began to pursue a revival of his forefathers’ heritage. Because of the overwhelming influence of European culture in the Fraser Valley, and because of the privacy among the various nations, it prevented the northern nations from sharing their art with the Salish people. “The wood carvers in the north thought it was amusing that I wanted to carve,” Stan recalls of the ‘Ksan, “They laughed, and said the Salish people did not know how to carve.”

Nevertheless, Stan spent six months in 1975 learning from northern carvers, living near Hazelton, and his former hobby has become his profession. “I always wanted to do Salish carving”, he explains, “but there was no market until I started to do the Spindle Whorl designs.”

Salish representation is more “Life-like” and realistic in comparison to northern tradition. Greene now lives with his wife and three daughters, where he plans to continue “To try to bring out the Salish, the way it was.”

EXHIBTIONS:2011 "Coast Salish Masterworks", Coastal Peoples Gallery
Hide artist biography
No products or art available.